Spring 2018 Course Descriptions (partial)

posted in: Blog | 0

Literature, Media, and Communication

 Spring 2018

Course Descriptions 

 

This is a list that will be updated as instructors submit paragraphs that better describe their version of the course (from the course catalog description).

 

LMC  2050  29130 Lit, Media, Comm Seminar  Instructor:  Santesso
(TR 1:30-2:45  Skiles 169)   Course restricted: Only LMC majors.

 

 
LMC Seminar: Utopia and Dystopia

In this seminar, we will trace the history of utopian thought (particularly in literature, but also in film, architecture, and other fields), and consider the emergence of dystopian cultural work as a response. What relationship does utopian literature or film have to real-world utopian projects? What is the future of utopian work and thought? And why does every single movie franchise have to be “dystopian” these days? We will read works ranging from More’s Utopia to present-day science fiction, along with a range of film and digital works.

 

 

LMC  2050  29130 Lit, Media, Comm Seminar  Instructor:  Senf
(TR 3:00-4:15  Skiles 314)   Course restricted: Only LMC majors

 

 
This course introduces second-semester majors to the six threads on which LMC majors can focus and to both primary and secondary research. The class will begin with an intensive study of Bram Stoker’s Dracula (literature, social justice, and science, technology, and culture) and to the various media in which it has been adapted. Students will then move into the more active study of social justice as it impacts Atlanta and the campus and will be encouraged to present their findings in ways that encourage exploration of communication practices and design.

 

 

LMC 2300: Intro to Biomed and Culture Instructor: Lagos
 
 

 

LMC  2400  Intro to Media Studies Instructor:  D. Wilson
(MWF 10:10-11:00  Skiles 169)   Course restricted: Only LMC majors

 

 
 

 

LMC  2500  Intro to Film     Instructor:  Zinman
(TR 1:30-2:45  Skiles 371)   Screenings: T 3-5  Skiles 002
This course provides students with a number of approaches—formal, historical, and theoretical—with which to analyze cinematic form and to understand how moving images make meaning. The class begins by examining cinema’s formal elements (cinematography, editing, mise-en-scène, sound) in order to establish the necessary terminology required for the analysis of film. We then turn to the conventions and critiques of Hollywood narrative filmmaking, considering issues of genre, authorship, and ideology, before considering some alternatives (avant-garde, art cinema, other national cinemas, documentary) to dominant Western film styles. The class concludes by interrogating the quickly shifting status of the moving image in the digital age, and asking what these technological changes might indicate for cinema’s future.

 

 

                                   

LMC  2500  Intro to Film     Instructor: Dalle Vacche
(TR 8:00-9:15am  Skiles 371) Screenings T 3-5   Skiles 371
 

 

LMC  2600  Intro to Perform Studies Instructor:  Auslander
(TR 12:00-1:15pm  Skiles 308)  
 

 

LMC  2661 Theatre Production I Instructor:  Foulger
(SUN 1:00-5:00pm  TBA)  
 

 

LMC  2662 Theatre Production II Instructor:  Foulger
(SAT 1:00-5:00pm  TBA)  
 
 

 

LMC   2720    Prin of Visual Design Instructor:  Kozubaev
(TR    3:00-4:15pm  Skiles 357)  
Studio-based course that provides students with basic skills needed to create digital visual images and to analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives.
Students will be given design problems growing out of their reading and present solutions using Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, and 3DstudioMax or similar 3D application. Students will also examine visual experience in broad terms, from the perspectives of creators and viewers. The course will address a number of key questions including: Why is the act of drawing considered by numerous disciplines to be a cognitive and perceptual practice? How do images produce significance or meaning? What is the role of technology in creating and understanding images and vision? What is the difference between the intention of the creator and the interpretations of the viewers? How do images function as a “language”?

 

LMC   2720    Prin of Visual Design Instructor:  Peer
(MWF 10:10-11:00 Skiles 357)

Course restricted: Only CM LMC majors.

 

 
Studio-based course that provides students with basic skills needed to create digital visual images and to analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives.
Students will be given design problems growing out of their reading and present solutions using Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, and 3DstudioMax or similar 3D application. Students will also examine visual experience in broad terms, from the perspectives of creators and viewers. The course will address a number of key questions including: Why is the act of drawing considered by numerous disciplines to be a cognitive and perceptual practice? How do images produce significance or meaning? What is the role of technology in creating and understanding images and vision? What is the difference between the intention of the creator and the interpretations of the viewers? How do images function as a “language”?

 

LMC  2730  Construct-Moving Image Instructor:  Freeman
MWF 12:20-1:10 Skiles 357) Course restricted: Only CM majors.  
 

 

LMC  2813   30881 Special Topics in STAC Instructor:  Appel-Silbaug

 

Course restricted: Permit required to schedule this course. Contact HP for permit.

(TR 9:30-10:45am  323   Clough Commons)  Honors Program students only.

Ethnography of Interfaith GT

 

LMC  3104  Age Scientific Discovery Instructor:  Wood
(TR 12:00-1:15  Skiles 314)

 

 
 

 

LMC  3112  Evolution & Industrial Age Instructor:   Senf
(TR 1:30-2:45pm   Skiles 308)

 

 
This class focuses on the rise of industrialism and colonialism in the nineteenth century and connects later nineteenth-century scientific and technological concepts and discoveries, particularly theories of evolution, to the fiction and poetry of the long nineteenth century. Students will read from the works of Charles Darwin and his contemporaries and analyze the representation of science and technology in short stories, novels, poetry, and scientific prose. Discussion will focus especially on how science and social values overlap, particularly in narrative representations of ethnicity, gender, and class.

 

 

LMC  3114  Sci, Tech & Modernism Instructor:   Leland
(MWF 12:20-1:10pm Skiles 317)

 

 
We examine a cross-section of the cultural/political/scientific ferment in the West in the first part of the 20th century—a time of general cultural paradigm crisis provoking new forms and models, new languages and dialects, as it were, for representing and making sense of the experience of modernity. The course materials are a mix of theoretical essays, scientific writings, and elite and popular artistic works. The material can be challenging (both in quality and quantity) but I think you will often find it exciting. Learning Outcomes: Students will have an informed sense of the intricately complex ways in which modern technology, modern science, modern political economy, urban concentrations of population, and modern warfare (WWI) affect and influence psychological and cultural contexts.

 

 

LMC  3202   Studies in Fiction Instructor:   Yaszek
(TR 3:00-4:15pm  Skiles 317)

 

 
Studies in Fiction: Global Science Fiction

 

This class will explore science fiction (SF) as a variety of texts that enable people to talk about their experiences with science and technology across centuries, continents, and cultures. In the first unit, we will explore the history and critical vocabulary of science fiction as it has developed in Europe and the United States over the past two hundred years. In the second unit, we will examine the transition from nationally- to globally-oriented science fiction through a case study of black speculative fiction, beginning with nineteenth-century African American alternate histories and extending to present-day African science fiction. In the third and longest unit, we will continue our study of science fiction from around the globe, including tales from South America, India, Russia, China, Japan, and the Middle East.

 

 

LMC  3204  Poetry and Poetics Instructor:  Leland
(MWF 1:55-2:45pm  Skiles 317)

 

 
What makes poetry different from other uses of language? Mostly, it is a matter of technique: poetry is more intricately patterned than prose. The patterns may be sound patterns (rhyme, rhythm and the like) or semantic patterns, patterns of meaning such as metaphor or image or allusion, or they may be visual patterns (lines, stanza shapes etc.). Often a poem will be patterned in all these ways, and more! More than emotional intensity or philosophical depth, this is what makes a poem a poem.

 

When I turn to the one I love and say “I love you,” that may signify a most profound and important feeling. But it is not a poem.

 

When I say: “I love you like October light

loves heathered hills,

loves slopes with wildflowers gone over,

loves little yellow leaves,

like flakes of light,

that drift down shadows, and trees

turning, half-undressed,

to meet its gaze.” …that’s a poem.

And we can think about and talk about how that poem works, or doesn’t work. In this class we will study and analyze some of the practices of poetic pattern-making in English. We will regularly write, read, and talk about (anonymously) our own poems too. There will be a steady practice of reading— poetry mostly, and thinking about what you have read, and trying to express your thinking both verbally in class and in written form. You will also probably produce a fairly steady stream of writing, both creative writing and analytical writing.

 

 

LMC  3204  Poetry and Poetics Instructor:   Lux
(F 3:00-5:45pm Skiles 343)

 

 
This class centers on the pleasures of reading poetry. Students from all backgrounds are invited to join this discussion-based class in which we will deepen our appreciation of the art form. Assignments include several short papers and a daily poetry journal. Attendance at Poetry@Tech readings is required.

 

 

LMC  3206  Communication & Culture Instructor:  Leibert
(TR 9:30-10:45am  Skiles 346) Course restricted: Only CM LMC majors.

 

 
 

 

LMC  3208  African-Amer Lit/Cult Instructor:  Morris
(TR 1:30-2:45pm  Skiles 311)

 

 
 

 

LMC  3210  Ethnicity American Cult Instructor:   Farooq
(TR 9:30-10:45am Skiles 317)

 

 
 

 

LMC  3214  Science Fiction Instructor:    Morris
(TR 3:00-4:15pm Skiles 308)

 

 
Afroturst Feminism

 

LMC  3215   Science Fiction Film TV Instructor:  Telotte
(TR 9:30-10:45am  Skiles 368)

 

Screenings: T 3:00-5:00pm  Skiles 368
This course explores how a specific genre works and what happens when it crosses conventional media boundaries. The course focuses on science fiction as it has developed during film history and as it has gradually become a popular form of television narrative. The course initially looks at how we define and distinguish different genres, how they share elements, and how they function culturally. It then examines how these generic characteristics developed from silent film to the present, and it considers several popular television series to determine what the various media versions of the genre share and how they differ. Our goal is threefold: to better understand how a particular genre works, to gain a sense of media science fiction’s history and themes, and to see how it is inflected by the two of the media in which it has found great popularity. Students attend weekly screenings, read material on genre and science fiction, and discuss the films, television episodes, and readings. Grades depend on two tests, a comprehensive final, an oral/written report, and a research paper.

 

 

LMC  3219  Literature & Medicine Instructor:   Hassan
(TR 9:30-10:45am Skiles 308)  
 

 

LMC  3225  Gender Study-Disciplines Instructor:  Pollock
(MWF 11:15-12:05pm Skiles 370)

 

 
This course explores the concept of gender and its usefulness as a theoretical category in a variety of disciplines. We will consider how gender matters in disciplines of engineering, and will include particular attention to LGBT issues. We will start with foundational conceptual and historical concerns, and then turn to issues in engineering education and engineering as a profession. Guest lectures by faculty from three engineering fields (electrical, civil, and biomedical) will provide additional context. Throughout the semester, students will work in groups to do research projects on a particular engineering sub/field of interest to them. Preparatory assignments will build toward a final research report on how gender matters in that particular engineering discipline.

 

 

LMC  3226  30595 Major Authors Instructor:  Fontaine
(MWF 12:20-1:10pm  Skiles 371) Major Author: David Foster Wallace
 

 

LMC  3226   27931 Major Authors Instructor:  Crawford
(TBA) Major Author: Melville
Major Authors: Herman Melville and the American Encounter with the South Pacific Islands— Taught in the New Zealand as part of the Pacific Program

 

Although best known for his whaling novel, Moby-Dick, Herman Melville began his career as a travel writer, producing several romances based on his experiences in the South Sea islands during the first part of the 19th century.  In some ways, this work could be considered proto-cultural anthropology and his observations approach the level of natural history. These books reflect on many of the questions that remain troubling even today:  the relation between so-called primitive and civilized societies, the ecological responsibilities of natives and explorers, and the function of science and technology in mediating and representing encounters between these disparate groups. This course will examine these issues as they are represented in two of Melville’s novels: Typee, and Moby-Dick, some of his shorter stories, and supplementary texts including readings in Darwin’s Voyage of the Beagle, background on the 19th Century whaling industry, and discussions of 19th century meteorology and cartography. Specific assignments will be linked to visits the museum of New Zealand “Te Papa Tongarewa” the Wellington Maritime museum, and the National Tattoo Museum of New Zealand.

 

 

LMC  3234  26955 Creative Writing Instructor:  Denton
(MW 8:00-9:15am  Swann 325)

Course restricted: Permit required to schedule this course.

Contact travis.denton@lmc.gatech.edu w/gtid for permit

 

 
 

 

LMC  3234  27902 Creative Writing-Screenwriting Instructor:  Reilly
(MW 9:30-10:45am Skiles 343)

Course restricted: Permit required to schedule this course.

Contact jc.reilly@lmc.gatech.edu w/gtid for permit

 

 
This semester’s creative writing class will focus on screenwriting, and students will write scripts for several 3-5 minute short films, which will then be “optioned” to be filmed in LMC 3406 Video Production in a subsequent semester. We’ll do writing exercises geared to developing character, plot, conflict, genre, story, etc., as well as learning to use script writing software, reading some scripts for inspiration, “recreating” film scripts based on what we see on screen, adapting stories for the screen, sharing scripts for peer review, critiquing current films, and possibly watching film clips as appropriate. The class is fun, but writing and drafting intensive. No previous creative writing experience is necessary–just an interest in writing and films!

 

 

LMC  3248  Poetry & Digital Culture Instructor:   Frazee
(TR 12:00-1:15pm  Skiles 371)

 

 
 

 

LMC  3252  Film and Television Instructor:   Wood
(TR 1:30-2:45pm Skiles 368) Screenings: TH 3:00-5:00pm Skiles 368
 

 

LMC  3253  Animation Instructor:  Madej
(MW 9:30-10:45am  Skiles 308)

 

 
 

 

LMC  3254  Film History Instructor:  Wang
(MW 8:00-9:15am Skiles 371) Screenings: M 4:30-6:30pm   Skiles 371
 

 

LMC  3256  Major Filmmakers Instructor:  Wang
(MW 9:30-10:45am  Skiles 371) Screenings: M 7:30-9:30pm Skiles 371
 

 

LMC  3258  Documentary Film Instructor:  Thornton
(TR 1:30-2:45pm Skiles 355)

Course restricted: Only CM FMS LMC majors

 
Advanced Video Production—Documentary

 

Documentaries help shed light on significant topics, and challenge its audiences to act on relevant issues of the day. The objectives of this course are to introduce students to the art of documentary filmmaking, and to explore the ways in which documentary filmmaking can serve as a catalyst for articulating social justice issues that prompt audiences to take action. Working in small, collaborative teams, students will learn to write and produce short documentary videos on social justice issues that are specifically related to the Georgia Tech Community, the City of Atlanta, and/or the State of Georgia. The course will conclude with screenings of student work at the Plaza Theatre (ATL), as part of LMC’s 2nd Annual Social Justice Student Film Festival (LMC SJSFF). The Social Justice Student Film Festival celebrates the work of emerging filmmakers by showcasing social justice centered docs that prompt audiences to take action.

 

 

LMC  3262  Performance Studies: Rock History Instructor:  Auslander
(TR 1:30-2:45pm Skiles 314)

 

 
 

 

LMC  3306  Science, Tech & Race Instructor:  J. Wilson
(TR 4:30-5:45pm Skiles 317)  
 

 

LMC  3308  Environment Ecocritic Instructor:  Loukissas
(TR 3:00-4:15pm  Skiles 170)

 

 
 

 

LMC  3314  Tech of Representation Instructor:   Klein
(TR 3:00-4:15pm Skiles 370)

Course restricted: Only CM LMC majors.

 

 
 

 

LMC  3402  Graphic & Visual Design Instructor:  Leibert
(TR 12:00-1:15pm  Skiles 346) Course restricted: Only LMC majors.

 

 
 

 

LMC  3403  BA1 Tech Communication Instructor:  Aldinger
(TR    1200-0115pm  370   Skiles) Course restricted: Only BA majors  
 

 

LMC  3403  BA2 Tech Communication Instructor:  Aldinger
(TR    0130-0245pm  302   Skiles) Course restricted: Only BA majors  
 

 

LMC  3403  BA3 Tech Communication Instructor:  Aldinger
(TR    0430-0545pm  302   Skiles) Course restricted: Only BA majors  
 

 

LMC  3403  BA4 Tech Communication Instructor:  Rogers
(TR    0930-1045am  302   Skiles) Course restricted: Only BA majors.  
 

 

LMC  3403  BA5 Tech Communication Instructor:  Rogers
(TR    1200-0115pm  302   Skiles) Course restricted: Only BA majors.

 

 
 

 

LMC  3403  BA6 Tech Communication Instructor:  Rogers
(TR    0130-0245pm  370   Skiles) Course restricted: Only BA majors.  
 

 

 

LMC  3403  26983 Tech Communication Instructor:  Herrington
(TR    0130-0245pm  317   Skiles) Course restricted: No CS majors.

 

 
LMC 3403 provides information regarding the principles and concepts of technical communication and creates opportunities for students to practice technical communication skills in developing proposals, analytical reports, and related oral presentations. Students will work in experiential settings to develop materials, gather responses, and engage in critical analyses while pursuing analytical projects. Beginning with the premise that technical communication exists only within contextual situations, and both uses and creates information designed for specific purposes in specific communities (those already existing within organizations as well as those created for a unique purpose), this course asks students to explore both primary and secondary research venues to analyze situations and audiences in their own disciplines to create documents and oral presentations which communicate through effective structure, prose, and visual presentation. Students will learn to analyze and produce functional documents that reflect the results of critical analyses and other pertinent experience. The assignments will include an annotated bibliography, a well-developed analytical report, a proposal, and an oral presentation. The course will cover foundational use of technical communication’s theoretical principles and concepts, treating analyses of epistemological grounding for rhetorical purposes—both analytical and productive—visual rhetoric/document design, ethics, intellectual property, usability testing, and audience issues. The required course products are all functional in nature and replicable for different purposes once students leave Georgia Tech.

 

 

LMC  3403  27913 Tech Communication Instructor:  Greene
(TR    0800-0915am  308   Skiles) Course restricted: No CS majors.

 

 
 

 

LMC  3408  Rhetoric-Tech Narratives Instructor:  Burnett
TR    0930-1045am  005   Stephen C Hall

 

 
 

 

LMC  3414  Intellectual Property Instructor:  Herrington
(TR 12:00-1:15pm Skiles 368)

 

 
Students will examine constitutionally informed policy and pragmatic legal issues in intellectual property law, focusing on the effects of power structures and information digitization. Students will master foundational understanding of intellectual property law as it affects/will affect them in their development of creative work. The course primarily provides an overview of the constitutional policy and law that drives copyright as a general structure. But it also covers statutory areas of the law that make up intellectual property, such as the protections for intellectual property: trademark, reputation and goodwill, trade secret, patent, and copyright. The range of discussion in each of these areas is determined by student interests and by their contributions, which complement regular course material.

 

 

LMC  3431  27052 Tech Comm Approaches Instructor:  Lozier
F     1010-1100am  101   Coll of Computi

 

 
 

 

LMC  3431 27053 Tech Comm Approaches     Instructor:  Lozier
F     1115-1205pm  101   Coll of Computi

 

 
 

 

LMC  3431  28239 Tech Comm Approaches Instructor:  Lozier
F     1220-0110pm  101   Coll of Computi

 

 
 

 

LMC  3431  28240 Tech Comm Approaches Instructor:   Fitzpatrick
F     0155-0245pm 101   Coll of Computi

 

 
 

 

LMC  3431  29453 Tech Comm Approaches Instructor:  Fitzpatrick
F     0300-0350pm  101   Coll of Computi

 

 
 

 

LMC  3431  29667 Tech Comm Approaches Instructor:  Fitzpatrick
F     0430-0520pm  101   Coll of Computi

 

 
 

 

LMC  3432  29451 Tech Comm Strategies Instructor:  Kirkscey
(WF 3:00-3:50pm Skiles 202)

 

 
 

 

LMC  3432  29452 Tech Comm Strategies Instructor:  Kirkscey
(WF 4:30-5:20pm  Skiles 202)

 

 
 

 

LMC  3432  27054 Tech Comm Strategies Instructor:  Lawrence
WF    1010-1100am  202   Skiles

 

 
 

 

LMC  3432  27055 Tech Comm Strategies Instructor:  Lawrence
WF    1115-1205pm  202   Skiles

 

 
 

 

LMC  3432  27056 Tech Comm Strategies Instructor:  Girard
WF    1220-0110pm  202   Skiles  
 

 

LMC  3432  28236 Tech Comm Strategies Instructor:  Girard
 
 

 

LMC  3661  Theatre Production III   Instructor:   Foulger
(TBA) Course meets in DramaTech theater.

 

 
 

 

LMC  3662  26968 Theatre Production IV Instructor:    Foulger
(TBA) Course meets in DramaTech Theatre  
 

 

LMC  3705  26970 Prin Information Design  Instructor:  Le Dantec
MW    0930-1045am  302   Skiles

Course restricted: Only CM majors

 
 

 

LMC  3710  Prin Interaction Design Instructor:   Jafarinaimi
(MW 3:00-4:15pm Skiles 302)

Course restricted: Only CM majors.

 
 

 

LMC  4100  N   L   29884 Seminar in STAC Instructor:  Santesso
(TR 12:00-1:15pm Skiles 311)

Course restricted: Permit required to schedule this course.

 

 
STaC Seminar: Surveillance and Culture

We frequently hear that we live in a “surveillance society.” But what does this mean, exactly? Is it simply that we occupy an environment filled with CCTV cameras? Or do we mean, as the phrase implies, that our culture, philosophy and even our basic view of the world have been fundamentally changed by surveillance? In this course, we will explore the ideological and social impact of surveillance and especially surveillance technology on our society. We will read a number of literary works which deal with surveillance (by authors including Orwell, Huxley, Gibson and Philip K. Dick), watch surveillance-themed films (The Conversation, Blow Up), and explore the impact of surveillance on philosophy, architecture, social behavior and communication.

 

 

LMC  4102  A   L   30156 Senior Thesis Instructor:  STAFF
(TBA) Course restricted: Permit required to schedule this course.

 

 
 

 

LMC  4102  B   L   30082 Senior Thesis Instructor:    STAFF
(TBA) Course restricted: Permit required to schedule this course.  
 

 

LMC  4204  Poetry and Poetics II Instructor:  Denton
MW 9:30-10:45am Skiles TBA  
Course restricted: Permit required to schedule this course.

Contact travis.denton@lmc.gatech.edu w/gtid for permit

Course meets 1st floor Skiles, Poetry@Tech office (across from the main elevator)

 

 

LMC  4400 Seminar in Media Studies:  CM Games Capstone Instructor:   Bogost
(TR 1:30-2:45pm  Skiles 357)

Course restricted: Only CM Jr/Sr majors.

Course restricted: Permit required to schedule this course

Prerequisites: 2700 and 1331 or 1322

 
 

 

LMC  4500   Seminar in Film Studies Instructor:   Dalle Vacche
(TR 9:30-10:45am Skiles  371) Screenings: W 3:00-5:00 Skiles 371)
 

 

LMC  4600 Seminar Perform Studies Instructor:  Auslander
(TR 1:30-2:45pm Skiles 314)

 

 
 

 

LMC  4602  N   L   27221 Performance Practicum        Instructor:  Foulger
TR    1200-0115pm  TBA

Course restricted: Permit required to schedule this course.

Contact melissa.foulger@lmc.gatech.edu w/gtid for permit.

Course meets in DramaTech Theater.

 

 
Directing for the Stage.

Learn the fundamentals of stage direction in this project-based class that culminates in a final performance.  Topics include script analysis, staging and working with actors.

 

LMC  4720  Interactive Narrative Instructor:  J. Wilson
(TR 3:00-4:15pm Skiles 269)

 

 
 

 

LMC  4725  Game Design Instructor:  Magerko
(TR 12:00-1:15pm Skiles 357)

 

 
 

 

LMC  4730  Experimental Digital Art Instructor:   Madej
(MW 3:00-4:15pm Skiles 308)

 

 
 

 

LMC  4813/6340 Special Topics: Mixed Reality Design Instructor:  Bolter
(TR 9:30-10:45am Skiles 357)

Course restricted: Only CM CS majors

 
 

 

LMC  4904  26981 Internship Contact: Kirkbride
(TBA) Course restricted: Permit required to schedule this course.  
 

 

LMC  4904  26980 Internship Contact: Hertel
(TBA) Course restricted: Permit required to schedule this course. Course restricted: Only LMC majors.